Vote

14947797_1141461325900883_5754059126705941825_nWe joined the early voting queue at Northeastern Illinois University’s El Centro location today. It is nice to have Early Voting, and it is even nicer to have Early voting locations that are open to all Chicago city residents regardless of residence location. I also appreciated the Election Commission’s list of voting locations ranked by degree of use. We chose the nearest among the lowest-use locations. It was still a 1 1/2 hour wait in line. That NEIU-El Centro building is cute and modular, but it heats up like a greenhouse. The voting room was crowded, hot, and airless. I started to feel pretty lightheaded, so I wonder how the elderly felt.

I would much rather go with a public holiday on Election Day, but I guess then all the poor and people of color will stream out to the polls, and the GOP would be bummed.

Our 10 year old was not happy to be stuck with us, but we were determined to have her join us. From the look of the crowd, I would guess it to be a solidly blue one, but I’m just an ethnographer. We took up booths, checked off our choices, and grabbed our wristbands.

As a US citizen, this is my first presidential vote.

This is also my first-ever presidential vote. I grew up in Pakistan when General Zia-ul-Haq occupied the Presidential building for 11 years. It’s telling that, as a child of military dictatorship, I didn’t even bother to vote in 1990 or 1993. I then left Pakistan and was in the UK as a British citizen, though I arrived in the US as an international student before the British election of 1997. Then I became a green card holder, and voted in the primaries – for Bernie. It is a sad day, in many ways, that I’m unable to vote for Bernie today.

It was only when I sat waiting for a booth that it struck me how historic the act of voting is. For most of human history, as I told my daughter, regular people did not have any input into who would rule. This point in human history is startling in contrast, where we do have input in the political process. But the contrast not a night-and-day one. The United States remains an oligarchy. Electoral colleges remain a problem.

Our political system is not the best we can do. It is desperately in need of reform. I voted, but with an eye to how much more we need to do. Not just on voting day, but everyday, not to protect the status quo but to make it better – to ensure regular people have better representation, better protection under the law, more equality, better lives.

As for third parties – good luck to them in the current circumstances. If the Greens succeed in capturing 5% of the vote, they become eligible for federal funding in the next election. That could change the terms of the political context entirely, and end the stranglehold of the two sets of elites.

The terror of a Trump presidency – which is an entirely horrific prospect, probably unprecedented in its  nature – leads critics of both parties to hold their noses and vote for Hillary Clinton, especially in swing states.

Get out and vote. Educate yourself about the candidates. Don’t be like the Brexit voters who voted with their moods, and then whined about how they really didn’t think anything was actually going to happen. In the context of human history, most of your ancestors wouldn’t have this opportunity at all. Treat it responsibly. This is no occasion for you to throw a hissy fit. Act like you’re actually 18+ years old.

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